• 1.
    A community proposes a design and location for installation
  • 2.
    For this step, you’ll work with your neighbors on a proposed design.
  • 3.
    3 design rules
  • 4.
    No speech. We do not want to regulate speech, so we don’t allow speech. This means no words, letters, numbers, or universally recognized symbols like a peace sign or logo. The painting can tell a story and be meaningful for the local neighbors. But, the general passer-by should not recognize it as a symbol with a specific meaning.
  • 5.
    No traffic control devices. Nothing that emulates a crosswalk, stop sign, stop bar, etc. Also, the geometry should be such that drivers do not alter their course to drive around the painting. This generally applies to round shaped paintings. We usually want something big enough that it doesn’t read like an island. Most paintings go to the curb. Also for this reason, we tend to be less comfortable with not painting in the parking lane. When cars aren’t parked there, we don’t want the parking lane to read as if it’s the travel lane.
  • 6.
    No copyright material.
  • 7.
     
  • 8.
     
  • 9.
    Design guidance 
  • 10.
    Draw on a piece of paper or an electronic background that is the same color as the street. This will help pick colors that get the type of contrast on the street you want to see. The permit you get will be down to the colors that you use.
  • 11.
    Use large, simple shapes. There is a great temptation to put in a lot of small detailed shapes. Fight this urge! Big simple shapes allow for much better inclusion. If a child, person in a wheelchair, or senior show up, big simple shapes allow them to put a brush in hand and participate. Also, big simple shapes makes install and maintenance much easier. You don’t want a design where your on the ground for 15-17 hours painting. You want one where you can use rollers and large brushes and get it done in 4-5 hours.
  • 12.
     
  • 13.
     
  • 14.
    Required elements of design for review by City Traffic Engineer
  • 15.
    The approved design will be carried with your petition for signature from neighbors. This ensures that the resident knows what they are approving when they sign the petition. This will include:
  • 16.
    The design depicted with the actual colors to be used,
  • 17.
    The actual location of the design. We will want to see if drawn on the roadway. We prefer that the design be depicted on an aerial image of the street available on Google Maps or similar. Show where it is on the street. Always feel free to give us a call if you want additional guidance.
  • 18.
    The actual size of the painting:
  • 19.
    If it is in an intersection, show the how far from the intersection the edges of the design will be. Generally, use the curb line at the intersection as the starting point for this measurement and show how many feet it goes down the street from that curb.
  • 20.
    If it midblock, show the start and end point of the painting by measuring from the curb an adjacent intersection to show how far down the street it is when it begins and then show how long the design will be.
  • 21.
     
  • 22.
     
  • 23.
    The City Traffic Engineer approves the design
  • 24.
    Follow the rules above. I will provide guidance through the process and am always available for you to check in for design guidance.
  • 25.
     
  • 26.
     
  • 27.
    A petition is created with signatures from 100% of the directly adjacent properties and a total of 80% of all properties along the street in each direction for 400 feet.
  • 28.
    Once the City Traffic Engineer approves the design, I will send you a petition, petition map, and a copy of the final approved design
  • 29.
    Carry the petition with approved design for signature. We want neighbors to know what they’re signing up for.
  • 30.
    Make sure not to get signatures until you have a final approved design. We can not accept any signatures before this point and will require you to get the signatures again if you get them too soon.
  • 31.
     
  • 32.
     
  • 33.
    Permits are issued for the painting and for a block party street closure to install the painting
  • 34.
    The petition I give you will be good for both a block party permit and for the Revocable Encroachment Permit that you will need for the painting. The block party permit allows you to close the road and my permit allows you to paint it. I have attached a copy of the Revocable Encroachment Permit for your review.
  • 35.
    You can learn more about block party permits at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/oni/33907.
  • 36.
     
  • 37.
     
  • 38.
    The painting is maintained as the community chooses.  Often maintenance occurs every 1 to 3 years. 
  • 39.
    There is no minimum maintenance requirement. These projects are owned by the community. At the City, we simply help with some professional services and a FREE permit (!). If you want to maintain it or not is up to you.
  • 40.
    As long as you don’t chance the design, the Revocable Encroachment Permit allows you to maintain it under the same permit. If you don’t change the design, in future years, you will only need a block party permit
  • 41.
    If you would like to change the design – even just the colors – you will need to get back in touch and go through the permit process. We want to make sure we know what is out there and that there is community involvement in decision making.
  • 42.
     
A community proposes a design and location for installation For this step, you’ll work with your neighbors on a proposed design. 3 design rules No speech. We do not want to regulate speech, so we don’t allow speech. This means no words, letters, numbers, or universally recognized symbols like a peace sign or logo. The painting can tell a story and be meaningful for the local neighbors. But, the general passer-by should not recognize it as a symbol with a specific meaning. No traffic control devices. Nothing that emulates a crosswalk, stop sign, stop bar, etc. Also, the geometry should be such that drivers do not alter their course to drive around the painting. This generally applies to round shaped paintings. We usually want something big enough that it doesn’t read like an island. Most paintings go to the curb. Also for this reason, we tend to be less comfortable with not painting in the parking lane. When cars aren’t parked there, we don’t want the parking lane to read as if it’s the travel lane. No copyright material. Design guidance Draw on a piece of paper or an electronic background that is the same color as the street. This will help pick colors that get the type of contrast on the street you want to see. The permit you get will be down to the colors that you use. Use large, simple shapes. There is a great temptation to put in a lot of small detailed shapes. Fight this urge! Big simple shapes allow for much better inclusion. If a child, person in a wheelchair, or senior show up, big simple shapes allow them to put a brush in hand and participate. Also, big simple shapes makes install and maintenance much easier. You don’t want a design where your on the ground for 15-17 hours painting. You want one where you can use rollers and large brushes and get it done in 4-5 hours. Required elements of design for review by City Traffic Engineer The approved design will be carried with your petition for signature from neighbors. This ensures that the resident knows what they are approving when they sign the petition. This will include: The design depicted with the actual colors to be used, The actual location of the design. We will want to see if drawn on the roadway. We prefer that the design be depicted on an aerial image of the street available on Google Maps or similar. Show where it is on the street. Always feel free to give us a call if you want additional guidance. The actual size of the painting: If it is in an intersection, show the how far from the intersection the edges of the design will be. Generally, use the curb line at the intersection as the starting point for this measurement and show how many feet it goes down the street from that curb. If it midblock, show the start and end point of the painting by measuring from the curb an adjacent intersection to show how far down the street it is when it begins and then show how long the design will be. The City Traffic Engineer approves the design Follow the rules above. I will provide guidance through the process and am always available for you to check in for design guidance. A petition is created with signatures from 100% of the directly adjacent properties and a total of 80% of all properties along the street in each direction for 400 feet. Once the City Traffic Engineer approves the design, I will send you a petition, petition map, and a copy of the final approved design Carry the petition with approved design for signature. We want neighbors to know what they’re signing up for. Make sure not to get signatures until you have a final approved design. We can not accept any signatures before this point and will require you to get the signatures again if you get them too soon. Permits are issued for the painting and for a block party street closure to install the painting The petition I give you will be good for both a block party permit and for the Revocable Encroachment Permit that you will need for the painting. The block party permit allows you to close the road and my permit allows you to paint it. I have attached a copy of the Revocable Encroachment Permit for your review. You can learn more about block party permits at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/oni/33907. The painting is maintained as the community chooses. Often maintenance occurs every 1 to 3 years. There is no minimum maintenance requirement. These projects are owned by the community. At the City, we simply help with some professional services and a FREE permit (!). If you want to maintain it or not is up to you. As long as you don’t chance the design, the Revocable Encroachment Permit allows you to maintain it under the same permit. If you don’t change the design, in future years, you will only need a block party permit If you would like to change the design – even just the colors – you will need to get back in touch and go through the permit process. We want to make sure we know what is out there and that there is community involvement in decision making.

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